IBM-UTokyo Lab

Aims and Objectives

Based on the spirit of the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the University of Tokyo and International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) on December 19, 2019, the University of Tokyo and IBM Japan will promote the Japan-IBM Quantum Partnership to make Japan a leader in quantum computing. Through this partnership involving Japanese industries, academia, and research institutions, the IBM-University of Tokyo Laboratory aims to build a unique ecosystem of quantum computing technologies in Japan to promote strategically important research and development activities related to quantum computing algorithms and applications, and to expand economic opportunities in Japan.

Greeting

Professor, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo Masashi Kawasaki

Professor, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo
IBM-UTokyo lab. director

Masashi Kawasaki

Eco-friendly and secure data handling is considered an essential requirement for Society 5.0, which can only be realized by overcoming core challenges such as digitization and carbon neutrality.
The key to overcoming these challenges is the social implementation of quantum computers and other quantum technology.
In a partnership with IBM Corporation, the IBM-University of Tokyo Laboratory will promote joint research with the industry using state-of-the-art quantum computers, as well as joint research using actual hardware to accelerate the social implementation of quantum technology.

General Manager and President , IBM Japan Akio Yamaguchi

General Manager and President , IBM Japan

Akio Yamaguchi

I am very pleased with the establishment of the IBM-University of Tokyo Lab.
Based on the Japan-IBM Quantum Partnership announced in December 2019, IBM has been working closely with University of Tokyo to accelerate quantum science, business, and education in Japan, in collaboration with member companies, government, and academia.

This year, IBM Quantum System One, dedicated system will be installed in Japan, and the Technology Development Lab will start its operation in University of Tokyo. It will support practical quantum application development and also support next-generation quantum hardware research and development, including the evaluation in a low temperature environment.

Through our activities at the IBM-University of Tokyo Lab, IBM will maximize the potential of quantum computing and contribute to solving critical social issues such as climate change, energy, and medicine.

Research

Boosting near-term quantum computation by machine-learning post-processing

Graduate School of Engineering , Professor | Takahiro Sagawa

Graduate School of Engineering
Professor

Takahiro Sagawa

Research Scientist | Antonio Mezzacapo

Research Scientist

Antonio Mezzacapo

In this project, we develop quantum-classical hybrid algorithms by combining quantum computation and classical machine learning. In particular, we aim to boost the performance of noisy and intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) computers available by the state-of-the-art technology, with the use of post-processing by machine learning such as neural networks. The goal of this project is application of the developed algorithms to important problems in material science such as quantum condensed-matter physics and quantum chemistry.

Towards Large-Scale Quantum Artificial Intelligence

International Center for Elementary Particle Physics , Associate Professor | Koji Terashi

International Center for Elementary Particle Physics
Associate Professor

Koji Terashi

Research – Tokyo Deputy Director, Distinguished Engineer | Tamiya Onodera

Research – Tokyo Deputy Director, Distinguished Engineer

Tamiya Onodera

Quantum Artificial Intelligence (QAI) is considered to be a promising quantum computing application in the present era of noisy-intermediate scale quantum computers. There are two aims in this research project: first, we focus on a QAI algorithm to coherently learn quantum data using quantum simulations of quantum field theory as benchmarks; second, we develop techniques to design quantum circuits and optimize quantum gates, tailored for specific high energy physics applications.

Quantum programming and algorithms based on higher-order quantum operations

Graduate School of Science , Professor | Mio Murao

Graduate School of Science
Professor

Mio Murao

Research Scientist | Antonio Mezzacapo

Research Scientist

Antonio Mezzacapo

To develop quantum information science and technology beyond the NISQ (Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum) era, we establish new programming methods that implement higher-order functions in quantum computers based on higher-order quantum operations. We are developing novel quantum algorithms and quantum applications for quantum simulation and quantum sensors based on this method. We also explore the new frontier of quantum computation by improving our understanding of the spacetime structure of quantum physics in terms of information processing and clarifying characteristic properties of parallelizability and causal structures of quantum programming.

Quantum/classical hybrid simulation of intense laser-driven multielectron dynamics

Graduate School of Engineering , Associate Professor | Takeshi Sato

Graduate School of Engineering
Associate Professor

Takeshi Sato

Quantum Application Researcher | Yukio Kawashima

Quantum Application Researcher

Yukio Kawashima

Quantum chemistry on quantum computers has attracted much attention as a promising target of near-term quantum devices. Quantum chemistry solves the time-independent Schrödinger equation of electrons. On the other hand, time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE) on quantum computers is far less investigated. One needs to solve TDSE to describe the light-matter interactions, which, however, suffers from the problem of combinatorial explosion peculiar to quantum many-body systems. In this research, we will implement a hybrid quantum/classical simulator of multielectron dynamics on IBM Quantum. Furthermore, we will extend the hybrid simulator to treat nonadiabatic dynamics where both electrons and nuclei are treated quantum mechanically. Using the simulator, we will demonstrate the first successful application of the real quantum computer to nontrivial multielectron and/or nonadiabatic dynamics such as dissociative ionization in a hydrogen molecule. This will pave the way for future realization, e.g., of accurate simulations of biologically relevant photoreactions, which would be difficult with a classical computer.

Spintronics and AI physics research for large-scale quantum processors

Graduate School of Engineering , Professor | Eiji Saitoh

Graduate School of Engineering
Professor

Eiji Saitoh

Research Staff Member | Naoki Kanazawa

Research Staff Member

Naoki Kanazawa

Quantum computation is now attracting attention in various fields, although there are fundamental issues yet to be solved for its practical application. In this project, by exploiting the spintronics and AI physics we have established so far, we will develop q-bit drivers and efficient calibration methods that are indispensable for improving the performance of quantum computers.

Quantum transduction using optomechanical system

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Associate Professor | Atsushi Noguchi

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences
Associate Professor

Atsushi Noguchi

Research Staff Member | Masao Tokunari

Research Staff Member

Masao Tokunari

Superconducting quantum circuits are being actively investigated for quantum information processing. In a quantum transducer, electromagnetic waves in the microwave region handled by superconducting quantum circuits are converted into light and vice versa. The quantum transducer provides a quantum interconnect between superconducting quantum computers, and also to control them optically. Therefore, the optical interface using quantum transducers will be a core technology for the expansion of quantum technologies such as large scale quantum computers and a quantum internet. In this research, we will develop a quantum transducer that connects light and microwaves via acoustic quanta such as vibrations of objects and elastic waves. By combining high performance optical waveguide, superconducting technology and optomechanical technology, we aim to achieve highly efficient optical microwave conversion.

Superconducting qubits with multi-junction architecture

International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, Director/Professor | Shoji Asai

International Center for Elementary Particle Physics
Director/Professor

Shoji Asai

Research Staff Member | Koji Masuda

Research Staff Member

Koji Masuda

Quantum states formed in relatively simple circuit dynamics of a superconducting processor are subject to external noise sources and unwanted inter-qubit interactions. Quantum states in a multi-junction circuit possess symmetry which can be used to protect qubits from noise effects. In this research, we will leverage the added circuit degrees of freedom of the multi-junction qubit to enhance the qubit performance. We will also explore novel two-qubit gates and gate decompositions using higher energy levels of the qubit, through which we aim to extend the computational capacity of current noisy superconducting processors.